Need Help With Your Homework?

I’m always amazed by the many resources provided by The Seattle Public Library.  Latest example?  Click here for information on how to get help with your homework, whether you’re young or old. 

First, 11 of the branch libraries have Homework Help Centers, where volunteers help students on a drop in basis during the school year.  Contact these branch libraries for information about when Homework Help is scheduled:  Beacon Hill, Broadview, Columbia, Delridge, Douglass-Truth, International District/Chinatown, Lake City, NewHolly, Northgate, Rainier Beach, and South Park.

Second, you can also get free on-line help from live tutors in math, science, English and social studies seven days a week from 3 p.m. – 11 p.m.  This help is available both in English and en Español.  You will need a Library card and your PIN (personal identification number) in order to log onto the Tutor.com Web site

Third, if the tutors are busy or if you want to look at other resources, the Tutor.com Web site also includes a SkillsCenter Resource Library, with lots of different worksheets, tutorials, and study guides about different subjects.  I took a look at one of the writing tutorials and got some great tips on punctuation.

Now lest you think that homework help is only available to students in K-12 or in college, the Tutor.com Web site also has an on-line Adult Education and Career Center that covers topics like career help, going back to school, and citizenship issues.  There’s even a resume writing workshop video available! 

And once you’ve finished your homework and have some time to relax, consider borrowing one of these books recommended by Friends’ board members:

The True Story of Hansel and Gretel, by Louise Murphy. Board member Connie reports that this book is set in occupied Poland during World War II, and tells the story of a 12-year old Jewish girl and her brother who are sent into the woods to flee the Nazis, and how they are able to survive.  The novel provides an intimate look at Nazi-occupied Poland.  Note:  this is not a book for children.

  

A Walk in the Woods : Rediscovering America on the Appalachian Trail, by Bill Bryson.    This is a  non-fiction comedic account of two tenderfeet (well, since there were two hikers, I should probably say they had four very tender feet) who try to hike the Appalachian Trail without much preparation or training.    Several reviewers have noted that this is more than a travel memoir, as the trip served as a re-introduction to America for the author after living in England for 20 years.   Board member Joan enjoyed listening to the audio version of the book, so the link above is to the audio version.

Wolf Hall:  a Novel,  by Hilary Mantel.  Board member Liz ‘s take on this book:  “It won the Man Booker prize last year- deservedly so.  Wolf Hall tells the Henry VIII/Anne Boleyn story (yay season 4 of the Tudors started last night!) through Thomas Cromwell’s eyes.  Cromwell comes across as a surprisingly cool guy, Anne as a high maintenance lady, and Henry as his petulant self.  It’s well written and totally engaging. “

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A Young Boy’s Letter To Mayor McGinn

Ezekiel’s letter:

My name is Ezekiel B.  I go to the Northgate Branch Library and I’m in the 4th grade.  I’m almost 10 years old.

I like to go to the public library.  The selection of books in any one subject is very limited at the school library, and it’s impossible to get digital materials there.  At the public library, I get a higher selection of books, like Stephen Jay Gould’s the Book of Life, which covers evolution of all of life on earth, or the Eyewitness Guide to Religion or The Definitive Guide to Kendo, a martial art I’m taking at the parks.  I can order these online to pick up at Northgate.

In Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade, we used to take Field Trips on Fridays to the Northgate library.  We could walk there.  Now it’s closed on Fridays, so the little kids at my school can’t go there for field trips.  Lots of times my mom can’t get me to the library until after work or on the weekends.  Mostly we just go on Saturdays, now, because we can’t go Sundays or many weekdays. 

Some kids can’t use the computer at home, so they need to do it at the library.  Please restore branch library hours for me and lots of other kids.

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Children are among the hardest hit by reduced library hours in several neighborhoods. Ezekiel presented this letter to Mayor McGinn at the Youth and Family Commuity Engagement Meeting held at Northgate Elementary on March 1.  There are two more community engagement meetings on: March 15 and 22. Will you find time to join these small group discussions to support libraries and brainstorm the best futures for our children and families?