Youth And Family Participants in Seattle Community Engagement Meetings Cite Reduced Library Access As Challenge

Mayor McGinn addresses participants

Participants in Seattle’s Youth and Family community engagement meetings are asking for longer library hours and seeking solutions to other “issues and challenges” that face our youth and families.

People are realizing that reduced library hours means less community resources available to address these critical issues and challenges.  Library programs like Homework Help establish important “afterschool tutoring” and “mentoring relationships.”  Structured programs and resources for immigrants and refugees offered by our libraries are critical free services that lead to “cultural competency” and provide “afterschool support.”   The branch libraries offer programs and needed space for “community engagement” and foster neighborhood pride.  Teen programs nurture “youth leadership.”

Librarians provide “healthy, ongoing relationships” with students and families. Children’s librarians augment “early childhood education” through Storytime and structured programs.

Libraries model “cross sector communication” by establishing bridges between cultural communities and bringing organizations together. They partner with and augment schools and  are THE academic resource for  homeschooling families. Libraries with open doors provide a presence in our neighborhood t0 bring us together and enhance “safety.” Libraries build community, feed minds and foster potential.  Do you want to see library hours restored or increased? Do you want to influence the City’s policy toward our children and families? Please attend one of the three remaining meetings. Make sure your voice is heard!

For more information on what to expect: advocacy@friendsofspl.org

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A Friend is Someone Who Likes You (and Who Volunteers at the Friends’ Book Sale!)

One of my best-loved books from childhood is A Friend is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund.  What child could resist a book (a hardback book of my very own!) that had been inscribed “I bought this in London for a sweet little girl on her fifth birthday.  With love, Auntie Mae.”   That book has accompanied me back and forth across the country through many moves, and still sits on my bookshelf today.  It is a sweet reminder of how much I enjoyed reading books as a child, and of course of my Auntie Mae.

Fast forward more years than I’d like to think, and I’m now a Friend of the Seattle Public Library.  With the help of numerous volunteers, the Friends sponsor their famous twice-yearly Book Sales.  The next Book Sale is on April 16 – 18, 2010, and will be held at Magnuson Park, at the Hangar in Building #30, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115.  Free parking is available, and Metro bus routes 30, 74, and 75 will also get you there.

Over 200,000 items will be offered for sale, so there’s bound to be something for everyone!  Hardbacks, paperbacks and audio books in the regular section are $1.00, and videos, CDs, and DVDs are $1.00 per piece.  There is also a special room for better books and for rare/collectible books and sets, where prices are as marked.

Once again we need about 350 volunteers to help with all aspects of the sale, from set-up to clean-up.  Won’t you be a Friend, and sign up via the volunteer form on the Friends’ web site or by emailing book.sale@spl.org?  You can volunteer for one (or more!) of the shifts that run from Thursday, April 15 through Monday, April 19.  Volunteers receive a coupon for two regularly priced books of their choice, and can also receive Community Service credit.

Any questions?  See the Booksale FAQ on the Friends’ website, and feel free to contact the Book Sale office at 206.523.4053 or book.sale@spl.org.