Friends of Seattle Public Library Blog

The goings on of the Seattle Public Library.

Volunteers Needed for Friends’ Spring Book Sale March 31, 2010

The Friends of the Seattle Public Library are in need of volunteers for the upcoming Book Sale, which will be held on April 17-18. All shifts are open, but the Monday, Sunday, and Saturday afternoon shifts are the most in need of help (in descending order of priority).

Volunteers receive a coupon for two free books from the regular book sections. Lunch will be provided on Monday.

Volunteer shifts:

Thursday, 4/15: 2- 5 p.m. and 5- 9 p.m. (set-up)

Friday, 4/16: 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. and 6:30- 9:30 p.m.

Saturday, 4/17 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. and 1- 5 p.m.

Sunday, 4/18: 11 a.m.- 4 p.m.

Monday, 4/19: 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. and noon – 4 p.m.(clean-up)

Tuesday, 4/20: 9 a.m.- 1 p.m. (clean-up)

For more information and an online volunteer form:

http://friendsofspl.org/booksalevolunteerform.aspx

For questions please call the Book Sale office (206) 523-4053

Thank you for your support of the Friends and The Seattle Public Library.

 

Swing into spring with new bling from the FriendShop! March 29, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — friendsofspl @ 9:22 am
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For ladies at lunch, join us for our first daytime artist event featuring Seattle Public Librarian Evelyn Ferguson.  The event begins at noon on Thursday, April 1st.  Evelyn’s whimsical, hand-crafted pieces are priced just right for all your spring gift-giving needs, including treats for yourself. 
Featured earrings: $12.00; keepsake wallet: $12.95

 

 

 

Policymakers, Please Note: Libraries Are Nation’s Computer Stop March 26, 2010

Are you at home looking at this blog? Are you at work?  We’re willing to bet that almost half of you are looking at this blog from your public library. Every time we walk into a library, we see full computer stations and laptops on desktops. “The computers are always jam-packed with neighbors of all ages, it is almost like the library functions as the South Park Computer Lab,” Shawna Murphy recently told us.

Now, a new study released this week from the University of Washington Information School, reveals exactly how many of us are relying on  library computer access for:  job searches (75% of respondents), health information (82% ), homework (42%), and staying in touch with family and friends (64%).

In the past year, one-third of our national population over the age of 14 used a public library to access a computer or to find wi-fi.

In the past year, 50% of the population between 14 and 18 used library computers – mostly for homework. 

What does this mean? It means libraries are indispensable extensions of our schools. They’re helping our kids with homework and college preparation and keeping our unemployed neighbors hopeful by offering a dependable and resourceful place to look for jobs. They’re bridging the digital divide that could separate us from one another.  They’re  a resource and investment that return exponential value to our communities-especially during periods of recession.

 “Policy makers must fully recognize and support the role libraries are playing in workforce development, education, health and wellness, and the delivery of government services,” Marsha Semmel of the Institute of Museum and Library Services said in response to the study’s findings.   Media headlines about the study also tell the story: “Web Usage up at libraries: many young, low-income people rely on public Internet access for research . . .” writes the Spokesman Review. “A third of Americans — about 77 million people — use public-library computers to look for jobs, connect with friends, do their homework and improve their lives,” writes the Seattle Times, citing the study’s findings. 

What can you do to help our libraries? Get involved with the Friends of The Seattle Public Library. advocacy@friendsofspl.org

 

Up Close and Personal at the South Park Branch Library March 20, 2010

Shawna Murphy

“I feel so personal about the South Park library,” Shawna Murphy told us.  “In this library, the staff know me and my family. The  level of service is just unbelievable. We’re all on a first name basis at my branch!”  Talk to anyone from this close-knit neighborhood and you’ll probably hear about two things: the pending closure of the South Park Bridge and reduced hours at the South Park Branch library. “Without the bridge out of the neighborhood the community will depend even more on our small library branch,” Murphy pointed out.

“Our library always has a lot going on,” Murphy, a mother and child care provider explained. ” The older kids in the neighborhood use our library as an afterschool hang out. Our kids section is in the front ¼ of the library so it’s the focal point.  And the computers are always jam-packed with neighbors of all ages, it is almost like the library functions as the South Park Computer Lab. “

Murphy and her small  child care group have been attending Story Time since the South Park branch opened three years ago, but reduced library service hours are impacting that routine.  “Our branch had to change the time of this offering,” Murphy said, “so story time is now offered at 11:15 instead of 10:15.  This new time frame will be a bit of a challenge because it will be cutting into our lunch & nap time and the children will not be at their best.”

In addition, the closure of the South Park branch twice a week, on Fridays and Sundays, cuts into Murphy’s personal routine. “Sunday was my personal day to go to the library, without the kids,” she confided.

When faced with dramatic budget cuts, the Seattle Public Library Board tried to equitably spread 7 day a week library service across the city.  Unfortunately, some of the neighborhoods where library service was reduced were in communities, such as South Park, where the library is greatly needed.  Driving to the next closest open library is sometimes difficult or impossible for families, and some report that it takes them two bus rides to find an open library.

Please help these communities by speaking out for restored library hours. Questions? advocacy@friendsofspl.org

 

Support the City’s Bid for Ultra High Speed Broadband Network! March 19, 2010

Longing for ultra-high speed Internet connectivity at home? Think how quickly you could log on to the Library’s Web site, search for books and check our online resources!

The City of Seattle is submitting a bid to Google, who will be  building ultra-high speed broadband networks in one or more trial location communities in the US.  How fast is fast?  Let’s just say speeds more than 100 times faster than what most Americans have access to today.  How cool is that?

Support the City’s bid, and tell Google  why your neighborhood, organization or business needs a fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) network.  Responses are due back to Google by March 26.

 

A Young Boy’s Letter To Mayor McGinn March 15, 2010

Ezekiel’s letter:

My name is Ezekiel B.  I go to the Northgate Branch Library and I’m in the 4th grade.  I’m almost 10 years old.

I like to go to the public library.  The selection of books in any one subject is very limited at the school library, and it’s impossible to get digital materials there.  At the public library, I get a higher selection of books, like Stephen Jay Gould’s the Book of Life, which covers evolution of all of life on earth, or the Eyewitness Guide to Religion or The Definitive Guide to Kendo, a martial art I’m taking at the parks.  I can order these online to pick up at Northgate.

In Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade, we used to take Field Trips on Fridays to the Northgate library.  We could walk there.  Now it’s closed on Fridays, so the little kids at my school can’t go there for field trips.  Lots of times my mom can’t get me to the library until after work or on the weekends.  Mostly we just go on Saturdays, now, because we can’t go Sundays or many weekdays. 

Some kids can’t use the computer at home, so they need to do it at the library.  Please restore branch library hours for me and lots of other kids.

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Children are among the hardest hit by reduced library hours in several neighborhoods. Ezekiel presented this letter to Mayor McGinn at the Youth and Family Commuity Engagement Meeting held at Northgate Elementary on March 1.  There are two more community engagement meetings on: March 15 and 22. Will you find time to join these small group discussions to support libraries and brainstorm the best futures for our children and families?

 

Need Help Keeping Track of What’s on Your “To Read” List? March 10, 2010

At the Columbia City Book Fest last October we met a woman who keeps a small book (like an address book) with a list of all the books on her “to read” list.  That way, she has her list ready when she wanders into a library branch or a book sale. 

I clip out book reviews and scribble down recommendations from friends, and then log onto the Seattle Public Library website to put those books on reserve.  Or if I’m in a rush I’ll email myself a reminder or create a note on my Blackberry.

Did you know that if you log into your account on the Library website you can create your own list of books you want to read or have read?  Click here if you want instructions on setting up and managing your list. 

And if you’re looking for suggestions on what to read, consider these book recommendations from members of the Friends’ Board.  You can click on the links below to get to the SPL site to reserve copies.

Spooner, by Pete Dexter.  Daniel Kraus’ review on Booklist Online  notes that “Dexter’s sprawling account of the life of Warren Spooner may be classified as fiction, but it incorporates plenty from the author’s own history. True, false, it doesn’t much matter—this gregarious curriculum vitae is just the ticket for those who like their comic realism served up with a side of Garpian absurdity. . . .  The emotional core, however, is Spooner’s relationship with his cautious yet luckless stepfather, Calmer. A once-promising ship commander whose botching of a sea burial began his slide toward mediocrity, Calmer is the steady path that forever eludes Spooner. But as both men grow older, their emotional fumbling toward each other becomes downright moving. A big, satisfying maybe-memoir.”

Justice:  What’s the Right Thing to Do?, by Michael Sandel.    Professor Michael Sandel teaches a popular course at Harvard about the every day moral decisions we face.  Although our board member hasn’t read Sandel’s book, she enjoyed watching the PBS DVD of some of Sandel’s actual classes at Harvard, in which he uses hypotheticals to help his students and (the viewer!) think critically about issues such as affirmative action, same-sex marriage, surrogate motherhood,  and how to determine how much a life is worth.  Watching students stake out and defend their positions and the logical consequences of those positions, is touching, maddening, and ultimately inspiring.

Read My Pins : Stories From a Diplomat’s Jewel Box, by Madeleine Albright, with Elaine Shocas, Vivienne Becker, and Bill Woodward.  Our board member enjoyed this memoir by Madeleine Albright, former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, who used her jewelry to make both personal and political statements.  “Before long, and without intending it, I found that jewelry had become part of my personal diplomatic arsenal. Former president George H. W. Bush had been known for saying “Read my lips.” I began urging colleagues and reporters to “Read my pins.” ” The book includes over 200 photos of pins from Albright’s collection, as well as many of the political figures and celebrities she met while wearing them.

Wicked Plants: The Weed that Killed Lincoln’s Mother and Other Botanical Atrocities, by Amy Stewart.     “They may look sweet and innocent, but anyone who has ever broken out in a rash after picking a hyacinth blossom or burst into violent sneezing after sniffing a chrysanthemum knows that often the most beautiful flowers can pack the nastiest punch. . . . . There are plants that can kill with a drop of nectar, paralyze with the brush of a petal. From bucolic woodland streams choked by invasive purple loosestrife to languid southern fields overrun by kudzu, some plants are just more trouble than they’re worth. Culling legend and citing science, Stewart’s fact-filled, A–Z compendium of nature’s worst offenders offers practical and tantalizing composite views of toxic, irritating, prickly, and all-around ill-mannered plants.”  –From Carol Haggas’ review on Booklist Online.

Snow Flower and the Secret Fan, by Lisa See.  Here’s Kristin Huntley’s assessment from her Booklist Online review:  “Mystery writer See, author of The Interior (1999) and Dragon Bones (2003), takes readers to nineteenth-century China to explore a complex friendship between two women. Lily is the daughter of a farmer in Puwei Village, and Snow Flower is the daughter of a respectable family from Tongkou, and though the two girls have very different backgrounds, Madame Wang pairs the two as laotong, or “old sames,” a bond that will last them a lifetime. . . .  . Their friendship is cemented during their youth and then put to the test when the girls prepare for marriage and Lily discovers a startling secret about Snow Flower’s family. . . .  See’s writing is intricate and graceful, and her attention to detail never wavers, making for a lush, involving reading experience. This beautiful tale should have wide appeal.” 

Reviews from Booklist Online are excerpted with permission.

 

Youth And Family Participants in Seattle Community Engagement Meetings Cite Reduced Library Access As Challenge March 5, 2010

Mayor McGinn addresses participants

Participants in Seattle’s Youth and Family community engagement meetings are asking for longer library hours and seeking solutions to other “issues and challenges” that face our youth and families.

People are realizing that reduced library hours means less community resources available to address these critical issues and challenges.  Library programs like Homework Help establish important “afterschool tutoring” and “mentoring relationships.”  Structured programs and resources for immigrants and refugees offered by our libraries are critical free services that lead to “cultural competency” and provide “afterschool support.”   The branch libraries offer programs and needed space for “community engagement” and foster neighborhood pride.  Teen programs nurture “youth leadership.”

Librarians provide “healthy, ongoing relationships” with students and families. Children’s librarians augment “early childhood education” through Storytime and structured programs.

Libraries model “cross sector communication” by establishing bridges between cultural communities and bringing organizations together. They partner with and augment schools and  are THE academic resource for  homeschooling families. Libraries with open doors provide a presence in our neighborhood t0 bring us together and enhance “safety.” Libraries build community, feed minds and foster potential.  Do you want to see library hours restored or increased? Do you want to influence the City’s policy toward our children and families? Please attend one of the three remaining meetings. Make sure your voice is heard!

For more information on what to expect: advocacy@friendsofspl.org

 

A Friend is Someone Who Likes You (and Who Volunteers at the Friends’ Book Sale!) March 1, 2010

One of my best-loved books from childhood is A Friend is Someone Who Likes You, by Joan Walsh Anglund.  What child could resist a book (a hardback book of my very own!) that had been inscribed “I bought this in London for a sweet little girl on her fifth birthday.  With love, Auntie Mae.”   That book has accompanied me back and forth across the country through many moves, and still sits on my bookshelf today.  It is a sweet reminder of how much I enjoyed reading books as a child, and of course of my Auntie Mae.

Fast forward more years than I’d like to think, and I’m now a Friend of the Seattle Public Library.  With the help of numerous volunteers, the Friends sponsor their famous twice-yearly Book Sales.  The next Book Sale is on April 16 – 18, 2010, and will be held at Magnuson Park, at the Hangar in Building #30, 7400 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, 98115.  Free parking is available, and Metro bus routes 30, 74, and 75 will also get you there.

Over 200,000 items will be offered for sale, so there’s bound to be something for everyone!  Hardbacks, paperbacks and audio books in the regular section are $1.00, and videos, CDs, and DVDs are $1.00 per piece.  There is also a special room for better books and for rare/collectible books and sets, where prices are as marked.

Once again we need about 350 volunteers to help with all aspects of the sale, from set-up to clean-up.  Won’t you be a Friend, and sign up via the volunteer form on the Friends’ web site or by emailing book.sale@spl.org?  You can volunteer for one (or more!) of the shifts that run from Thursday, April 15 through Monday, April 19.  Volunteers receive a coupon for two regularly priced books of their choice, and can also receive Community Service credit.

Any questions?  See the Booksale FAQ on the Friends’ website, and feel free to contact the Book Sale office at 206.523.4053 or book.sale@spl.org.

 

 
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