Friends of Seattle Public Library Blog

The goings on of the Seattle Public Library.

What the board was reading in August September 11, 2008

Flower Hunters by Mary Gribbin and John Gribbin  Checked in at SPL

 

This book chronicles the adventures of 11 intrepid explorers who searched the world for extraordinary plants.  Details of their trips and the impact their findings had on science and our yards are told in a way that very much impressed one board member.

 

King Jesus by Robert Graves

 

Robert Graves uses his superb narrative powers, his painstaking scholarship, his wit and unsurpassed ability to recreate the past, to produce a magnificent portrayal of the life of Christ on earth. Long out of print, SPL does not have a copy.  (Description adapted from the publisherʼs note on Powellʼs Books which also says that it is a controversial book.)

 

The Mitford Years (Series) by Jan Karon  All but The Wedding Story are checked in at SPL

 

This is a series of novels about folks including Father Tim in a small town in the mountains of North Carolina.  It is so popular that there is a cookbook with recipes from this mythical town.  The first novel is At Home in Mitford others include A Light in the Window, A New Song, The Wedding Story, and Shepherds Abiding.  (Note that the SPL list of suggested books includes The Mitford Sisters written by Nancy Mitford.  These sisters are not like the residents of Mitford, N. C. but The Mitford Sisters is a good book.)

 

The Perfect Summer: England 1911, Just Before the Storm by Juliet Nicolson Checked in at SPL

 

This is a lively social history of London and environs in the very hot summer of King George Vʼs coronation and labor strikes. Ms. Nicolson makes good use of papers and diaries of notable individuals including Queen Mary and Winston Churchill and also gives details of the life of the poor such as detailing the cost of a childʼs funeral.

 

The Redheaded Princess by Ann Rinaldi  Checked in at SPL

 

The author has written a number of other historical fiction novels for children, young adults and adults. This one tells the story of Queen Elizabeth starting when she was only 9 and a long way from next in line for the throne.  The story primarily concentrates on her time in exile. 

 

The Twilight Saga (series) by Stephenie Meyer

 

This series consists of four novels Twilight, New Moon, Eclipse, and Breaking Dawn.  A teenage girl moves to Forks, WA and falls in love with a vampire.  The fourth book completes the story.  The series is extremely popular with all 4 books having many holds at SPL.

 

Wait Till Next Year by Doris Kearns Goodwin  Checked in at SPL

 

The author is known for her excellent American histories.  In this memoir, her focus is on childhood summers spent following the Boston Red Sox on the radio.  She tells how her love of the team facilitated a special connection to her father who was also a fan.

 

 

Enjoy!

Photocredit: www.soycandlesbyphebes.com

 

Kate Pappas…Adding value in Rainier Beach September 4, 2008

What a terrific testimony to being involved and appreciated by one’s community….

Name

Kate Pappas

Branch   

Rainier Beach    

What is your favorite word? 

I think “thanks” is about the best word around!       

What word do you wish you had made up? 

After cleaning my windshield, I’d have to say I wish I’d made up the word “squeegee” because it sounds so funny, exactly like what it does after you Windex the window.

How did you become librarian of your branch?

I worked at the old Holly Park branch, and had some hours at Rainier Beach. During a musical chairs redistribution of CSL staff,  the rest of my hours got shifted to The Beach. I discovered  then that I liked being there full-time, and I still do.

What is on your desk right now?

Right now, there is a puppet cat named “Midnight,” five little toy mice that came as prizes in bags of “Good Mews” kitty litter, some children’s paperbacks, a flannel board set that I need to put away, a little Polish doll and a pair of Mickey and Minnie salt and pepper shakers.

 

 

(We won’t mention the calendar, photos and comic strips on the bulletin board)       

Tell us about your library. 

Our library is one of the best in the world. We are the most-southeasterly of the city libraries, in a diverse neighborhood not too far from Lake Washington. Our building theme (after Libraries For All) suggests a beach. We have wavy bulletin boards, ripple designs in our pavement, and restful beach colors of sand and soft blue. The children’s area (my personal favorite –can you tell that I’m a children’s librarian?) even has bookcases with frogs, cat-tails and a sea-gull.       

How long have you been at the branch?

Part-time since 1989 and full-time since 1995 (except, of course, when I was redeployed during the remodeling)       

What other posts do you hold in your community?

none–“children’s librarian” is fine with me   

What is the biggest impact the capitol campaign has had on your branch?    

We have changed from a dingy, industrial, gloomy facility, to a bright and inviting building with increased space, study rooms, and inviting lighting. I love to see the faces of people who haven’t been here for a while, who remember the old branch. They always have compliments and they always comment about how they liked how it has changed. Of course, we always respond with “Thank you–it’s nice to hear that; we like it too!”    

How does your relationship with the community affect your programming?    

My long-term relationship with the Rainier Beach community affects my programming in two ways.
First, of course, people seem to think of me as a ‘community helper and friend.”  Many of them know me and recognize me, as they did at a recent community event held in a local park (we had a table next to other community organizations at a “Back 2 School Bash” picnic where children were given backpacks filled with school supplies) 

 

School children are delighted to walk in and see me because, they tell me, “You came to my school!” Parents and teachers have also gotten to know me, and it has been my joy to watch so many young people grow up and mature. Some area child care centers have asked me to visit them and do presentations on Early Literacy. I feel that the community considers me, overall, to be a useful member and welcomed all over.

 

Second, when planning library programs for our community, I try to think of programs which will appeal to our diverse and multicultural clientele. Amy Twito always has an excellent selection of summer programs from which we can choose. Valerie Wonder has helped us begin and continue story times held in Mandarin Chinese which have a small but loyally devoted audience.

 

 

 

 
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